oneschemeofhappiness

Related Schemes and Literature

Archive for the category “language”

First Strike

Is it OK to strike first? The vagaries of English have struck first. They like to do that. And anything English does, is A-OK by me.

My hope is that I will strike it rich. In that case, I really don’t care who went first. If it is the first grocery store to strike, well then it depends how hungry I am. Hungry = Don’t strike first. But then my stomach has kind of struck first already, so technically they wouldn’t be striking first.

In bowling, it is tantamount to strike first and often in order to rack up the highest score. If you know that you can pull off the first strike successfully, then you may also be able to parlay that into a liquid commodity procured via the wallet(s) of your defeated foe(s), from the bar.

Tyoes usully strike fist and may go unoticed. Thankfilly I find and eradictate them all! I laugh at there feebil attempts! Bwahaha! Note: Apparently typos have feelings, too. As I was typing this last sentence, three words flashed on the screen. YULE BEE SARI, –THE TYPOS Not sure what they meen, but their only tpos aftr all.

Jackie Chan’s First Strike was a fun movie. Lot’s of action and not too much plot to get in the way. And he got to wear a marine land shark character suit.

If you are a pitcher, you job depends on striking first. If you are the batter, though, you ought not ever strike, first or otherwise.

Other than those times listed above, I’d have to say it really depends. Thankfully I am rarely in situations where I will have to attack. Sometimes, too, it is better to wait and let the other strike first. This is becoming more apparent to me playing chess. It goes against my natural instinct to wait. I like to capture pieces. Unfortunately, I find myself at a distinct material disadvantage in the middle game, without a clear recollection of exactly how that came to be the case. If I wait, I am more likely to keep even or even be ahead a point or two. It makes the difference.

BTW–since I wrote that section about typos, I have hit way more wrong keys than usual. Funny. But just in case, I hereby offer formal apologies to THE TYPOS.

Rhythm

This is from my reply to today’s daily post challenge. Some of the references are to others’ comments
Heartbeats are nice and fluffy, but really it has more to do with the natural stress patterns in English. Latin and Greek meter are quite different, and orators were expected to use specific meter in their speeches, and it wasn’t iambic.
It only sounds forced if you don’t know what you are doing (see this awful thing for an excellent example of ‘sounding forced’).
Self deprecation aside, the point of using meter is that it easy to get it right in a particular language but have it sound terrible, and a challenge to make it sound natural. The art of it is in having self-imposed limitations and still expressing your feelings. I would say that this tension forces the artist to look more deeply into his or her feelings. The choice is not arbitrary, but comes about through the need to be challenged in the context of a particular language, and yet still be successful at that challenge. Paradise Lost by Milton is in (a lot) of iambic pentameter. It sounds very natural, well at least to someone in 17th century England. Convoluted at times, most definitely, but not forced.

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